Things in the Drawer

Old drawers have the power of turning the smallest things into treasures. Inside them, what once was a piece of 'everyday' becomes a portion of life and past. Aiming high , I hope 'Things in the drawer' will someday become that to you and me.
(Current obsession: Game of Thrones)


Ask me anything  
Reblogged from brudesworld
brudesworld:

Idun and the Apples by James Doyle Penrose from Teutonic Myths and Legends, 1890

brudesworld:

Idun and the Apples by James Doyle Penrose from Teutonic Myths and Legends, 1890

Reblogged from niklasaftusby
niklasaftusby:

Valdemar Atterdag brandskattar Visby (1881) by Carl Gustaf Hellqvist

niklasaftusby:

Valdemar Atterdag brandskattar Visby (1881) by Carl Gustaf Hellqvist

Reblogged from oldpaintings
oldpaintings:

Flying Fish, 1910 by Herbert James Draper (English, 1864—1920)

oldpaintings:

Flying Fish, 1910 by Herbert James Draper (English, 1864—1920)

Reblogged from lagerthastormborn
Reblogged from thelighthouseofwolves
thelighthouseofwolves:

Lagertha from Vikings en We Heart It.

thelighthouseofwolves:

Lagertha from Vikings en We Heart It.

Reblogged from gameofthronesdaily

Season 4 Gag Reel (shown before SDCC 2014 Panel)

Reblogged from ladyrosenred
ladyrosenred:

Book cover illustration for “Emperor of Thorns”, by Mark Lawrence.

ladyrosenred:

Book cover illustration for “Emperor of Thorns”, by Mark Lawrence.

Reblogged from leprincelointain
leprincelointain:

Edmund Dulac (1882-1953), She played upon the ringing lute, and sang to its tones, The Wind’s Tale - 1911

leprincelointain:

Edmund Dulac (1882-1953), She played upon the ringing lute, and sang to its tones, The Wind’s Tale - 1911

Reblogged from leprincelointain
leprincelointain:

William Heath Robinson (1872-1944), The Book of Witches - 1908

leprincelointain:

William Heath Robinson (1872-1944), The Book of Witches - 1908

Reblogged from leprincelointain
leprincelointain:

George Hitchcock (1850-1913), Vanquished -1895

leprincelointain:

George Hitchcock (1850-1913), Vanquished -1895

Reblogged from thedruidsteaparty
My religion is nature. That’s what arouses those feelings of wonder and mysticism and gratitude in me. Oliver Sacks (via elfofthewoodlandrealm)

(Source: thedruidsteaparty, via chignonesque)

Reblogged from magictransistor
magictransistor:

Arthur Rackham, Faerie Folk (Frontispiece), Duffield & Company, 1914.

magictransistor:

Arthur Rackham, Faerie Folk (Frontispiece), Duffield & Company, 1914.

(via elpasha71)

Reblogged from fleurdulys
fleurdulys:

The Lake and the Night - Lucien Levy-Dhurmer
1910

fleurdulys:

The Lake and the Night - Lucien Levy-Dhurmer

1910

(via the-shadow-is-a-passing-thing)

Reblogged from indigenousdialogues
indigenousdialogues:

Beowulf Replies Haughtily to HunferthJohn Henry F. Bacon1910"What a deal hast uttered, dear my Unferth,drunken with beer, of Breca now,told of his triumph! Truth I claim it,that I had more of might in the seathan any man else, more ocean-endurance.We twain had talked, in time of youth,and made our boast, — we were merely boys,striplings still, — to stake our livesfar at sea: and so we performed it.Naked swords, as we swam along,we held in hand, with hope to guard usagainst the whales. Not a whit from mecould he float afar o’er the flood of waves,haste o’er the billows; nor him I abandoned.Together we twain on the tides abodefive nights full till the flood divided us,churning waves and chillest weather,darkling night, and the northern windruthless rushed on us: rough was the surge.Now the wrath of the sea-fish rose apace;yet me ‘gainst the monsters my mailed coat,hard and hand-linked, help afforded, — battle-sark braided my breast to ward,garnished with gold. There grasped me firmand haled me to bottom the hated foe,with grimmest gripe. ‘Twas granted me, though,to pierce the monster with point of sword,with blade of battle: huge beast of the seawas whelmed by the hurly through hand of mine.”From Beowulf as translated by Frances B. Grummere

indigenousdialogues:

Beowulf Replies Haughtily to Hunferth
John Henry F. Bacon
1910

"What a deal hast uttered, dear my Unferth,
drunken with beer, of Breca now,
told of his triumph! Truth I claim it,
that I had more of might in the sea
than any man else, more ocean-endurance.
We twain had talked, in time of youth,
and made our boast, — we were merely boys,
striplings still, — to stake our lives
far at sea: and so we performed it.
Naked swords, as we swam along,
we held in hand, with hope to guard us
against the whales. Not a whit from me
could he float afar o’er the flood of waves,
haste o’er the billows; nor him I abandoned.
Together we twain on the tides abode
five nights full till the flood divided us,
churning waves and chillest weather,
darkling night, and the northern wind
ruthless rushed on us: rough was the surge.
Now the wrath of the sea-fish rose apace;
yet me ‘gainst the monsters my mailed coat,
hard and hand-linked, help afforded, —
battle-sark braided my breast to ward,
garnished with gold. There grasped me firm
and haled me to bottom the hated foe,
with grimmest gripe. ‘Twas granted me, though,
to pierce the monster with point of sword,
with blade of battle: huge beast of the sea
was whelmed by the hurly through hand of mine.”

From Beowulf as translated by Frances B. Grummere

(via guthbrand)

Reblogged from lifesimpermanence
lifesimpermanence:

original artwork for Agalloch, by Fursy Teyssier of Les Discrets

lifesimpermanence:

original artwork for Agalloch, by Fursy Teyssier of Les Discrets

(via hiperbole)